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01

Sep

How is a chemical attack on a Syrian worse than the systematic aerial bombardment of unarmed Sudanese civilians by Sudanese armed forces Antonov planes, circling above villages daily, indiscriminately dropping bombs containing scrap metal? Does the suffering of a little Sudanese girl cut in two by hot metal rate less on the hierarchy of misery than a little girl gassed in Syria?

As the people of Sudan’s Blue Nile region mark the second anniversary of the start of their government’s deadly campaign of ethnic cleansing against them, they will question the West’s selective humanitarian impulses. — Syria and Sudan: Our Selective Moral Outrage | Rebecca Tinsley

(via intamunu)

13

Aug

We have no interest in supporting groups in Syria, especially if the outcome of the fighting is not clear. These allegations are meant to harm our relations with countries Sudan has good relations with.
Western officials and Syrian rebels say the Sudanese government has sold weapons to Qatar which arranged delivery to Syria through Turkey. Sudan has not publicly acknowledged these deals.

13

Nov

"In a word, they hope that the world may be persuaded to act in a manner consistent with its principles: Why, after all, indict Sudan president Omar al-Bashir for crimes against humanity if only to permit him to perpetuate those crimes with impunity?"
— Bernard-Henri Lévy on Sudan’s Forgotten War

"In a word, they hope that the world may be persuaded to act in a manner consistent with its principles: Why, after all, indict Sudan president Omar al-Bashir for crimes against humanity if only to permit him to perpetuate those crimes with impunity?"

Bernard-Henri Lévy on Sudan’s Forgotten War

28

Jul

jeuxdeau:

“If I ran for Sudan, I would be betraying my people. I would be dishonoring the two million people who died for our freedom. I want to bring honor to my country. People who just want glory, the spotlight of the Olympics, they don’t care about other people. I’m fighting for independent status because I do care. When I run, I want people to see me and say, ‘He is from South Sudan.’”- Guor Marial, running under the Independent Olympic Athletes flag in London, 2012

jeuxdeau:

“If I ran for Sudan, I would be betraying my people. I would be dishonoring the two million people who died for our freedom. I want to bring honor to my country. People who just want glory, the spotlight of the Olympics, they don’t care about other people. I’m fighting for independent status because I do care. When I run, I want people to see me and say, ‘He is from South Sudan.’”
-
Guor Marial, running under the Independent Olympic Athletes flag in London, 2012

19

Jun

People are arriving in such an emaciated state that our medical staff are struggling to revive them. They have gone too long without food and water. My role as an epidemiologist is to get a handle on how big the emergency is. We measure this through the mortality rate…
Ruby Siddiqui is an epidemiologist currently working on the refugee crisis in South Sudan. (via doctorswithoutborders)

16

Jun

doctorswithoutborders:

Refugees in South Sudan: “We Walked for Six Days … With Nothing But Our Clothes” “We were on the road for two months. Many villages we went through kept being bombed, so we had to keep fleeing. We had food for two weeks, then we ran out. We ate the lalop fruit and leaves from trees. We gave food for the children mostly, and some days we had nothing to eat. Some people got very sick and we had to leave some by the road—we could not carry them and they were too weak to continue.” —28-year-old mother of six childrenPhoto: Refugees fleeing conflict and food insecurity in the Nuba Mountains face insufficient levels of assistance in Yida camp. South Sudan 2012 © Sally McMillan

doctorswithoutborders:

Refugees in South Sudan: “We Walked for Six Days … With Nothing But Our Clothes”

“We were on the road for two months. Many villages we went through kept being bombed, so we had to keep fleeing. We had food for two weeks, then we ran out. We ate the lalop fruit and leaves from trees. We gave food for the children mostly, and some days we had nothing to eat. Some people got very sick and we had to leave some by the road—we could not carry them and they were too weak to continue.”

—28-year-old mother of six children

Photo: Refugees fleeing conflict and food insecurity in the Nuba Mountains face insufficient levels of assistance in Yida camp.

South Sudan 2012 © Sally McMillan

20

Apr

In the climate of ongoing tensions between Sudan and South Sudan, I am deeply concerned that armed movements are seeking to destabilise Darfur. I reiterate my call on the armed movements to discard the logic of war and to join the peace process for the sake of the long-suffering people of Darfur.
South Sudan Announces Heglig Withdrawal
Reading a statement from South Sudan President Salva Kiir, government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin announced the pullout of South Sudan‘s army — the SPLA — from the Heglig area on Friday.Called Panthou by South Sudan, the Heglig oil field produces half of Sudan’s oil, and the international community has repeatedly called for South Sudan to withdraw as war rhetoric from Sudan has mounted.
"In conformity with the U.N. Security Council presidential statement, and in response to appeals by world leaders and to create an environment for the resumption of dialogue with Sudan, the Republic of South Sudan announces that SPLA troops have been ordered to withdraw from Panthou-Heglig," said Benjamin. "An orderly withdrawal will commence immediately and shall be completed within three days."
But Benjamin said that South Sudan’s pullout did not mean it had given up its claims to Heglig or other contested areas along the oil-rich border that has yet to be defined following southern independence in July.
PHOTO: Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, center, waves from the back of a truck during a visit to North Kordofan, Sudan, Thursday, April 19, 2012.  (AP Photo/Abd Raouf)
(story;photo)

South Sudan Announces Heglig Withdrawal

Reading a statement from South Sudan President Salva Kiir, government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin announced the pullout of South Sudan‘s army — the SPLA — from the Heglig area on Friday.

Called Panthou by South Sudan, the Heglig oil field produces half of Sudan’s oil, and the international community has repeatedly called for South Sudan to withdraw as war rhetoric from Sudan has mounted.

"In conformity with the U.N. Security Council presidential statement, and in response to appeals by world leaders and to create an environment for the resumption of dialogue with Sudan, the Republic of South Sudan announces that SPLA troops have been ordered to withdraw from Panthou-Heglig," said Benjamin. "An orderly withdrawal will commence immediately and shall be completed within three days."

But Benjamin said that South Sudan’s pullout did not mean it had given up its claims to Heglig or other contested areas along the oil-rich border that has yet to be defined following southern independence in July.

PHOTO: Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, center, waves from the back of a truck during a visit to North Kordofan, Sudan, Thursday, April 19, 2012.  (AP Photo/Abd Raouf)

(story;photo)

19

Apr

We will not give them an inch of our country, and whoever extends his hand on Sudan, we will cut it.
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir speaking about his country’s current conflict with their southern neighbors over the oil-producing Heglig region. (source)

12

Apr

I always say we will not take the people of South Sudan back to war, but if we are being aggressed like this we will have to defend ourselves. I am appealing to the citizens of the Republic of Sudan, especially the mothers, not to allow their children to be dragged into a meaningless war.

Kiir told lawmakers to a standing ovation that he had told UN chief Ban Ki-moon in a telephone call Wednesday that “if you are not moving these forces of Bashir out of Abyei, we are going to reconsider our position and we are going to head to Abyei.”

In Khartoum, Bashir said “our brothers in South Sudan have chosen the path of war, implementing plans dictated by foreign parties who supported them during the civil war.

"War is not in the interest of either South Sudan or Sudan but, unfortunately, our brothers in the South are thinking neither of the interests of Sudan or of South Sudan," he told reporters.

This week’s clashes follow border fighting that erupted last month between the neighbours, and which each side has blamed the other for starting. (source)